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Fracture Treatments

Ankle Fracture
In cases of the stable ankle, a brace or a short leg cast are applied to immobilize the area and allow it to heal properly. But in case of out of place fracture or unstable ankle, surgery is required to reposition the bone fragments and hold them together with special screws and metal plates.

Elbow Fracture
Some of the elbow fractures may require only splint, sling or cast to hold the elbow in place but displaced or open fractures require surgical treatment.

Femur Shaft Fracture
Some of the distal femur fractures may be treated with skeletal traction or casting and bracing. But the rest of the complicated fractures need surgical treatment that can be an internal or external fixation.

Finger Fracture
Finger fractures may be treated with splint or cast to hold the injured finger straight and protect it from further injury. But some of the fractures may require surgery to put the bones into alignment.

Forearm Fracture
Stable forearm fractures can be treated with splint or cast by immobilizing the injured forearm. But some of the fractures may require surgery to put the bones into alignment and secure them in place.

Hand Fracture
Most of the hand fractures can be realigned by manipulation without surgery. A splint, brace or cast is applied for immobilizing the injured hand. But some of the fractures may require surgery to put the bones into alignment and secure them in place.

Heel Fracture
Most of the heel fractures require surgery to reconstruct the normal anatomy of the heel and restore mobility so that patients can return to normal activity. Very rarely, nonsurgical treatment including immobilization by cast, brace and splint is recommended if the pieces of broken bone have not been displaced by the force of the injury. It is ideal to wait for 5 to 7 days till the swelling subsides for surgery.

Hip Fracture
Some fractures of the hip can be managed non-surgically if the patient is too ill to undergo surgery. But the rest of the fractures require surgery to reconstruct the normal anatomy of the hip and restore mobility so that patients can return to normal activity.

Knee Fracture
Some of the fractures of knee are managed by non-surgical treatment including immobilization by splint, brace. But the rest of the fractures require surgery to reduce the bone and restore mobility so that patients can return to normal activity.

Shoulder Fracture
Treatment of most of the shoulder fracture involves its immobilization with a sling or shoulder immobiliser. Some fractures of Humerus, clavicle, need surgery for fixation of the fracture fragments with plates and screws.

Wrist Fracture
Stable fractures of the wrist can be managed by cast or splint while unstable fractures often require surgery to restore and hold the alignment.

Pelvic Fracture
Treatment depends upon the severity of the injury. While lower-energy fractures can be managed with conservative care, treatment for high-energy pelvic fractures usually involves surgery to reconstruct the pelvis and restore stability so that patients can resume their daily activities.

Unhealed Fractures Treatments
Some non-united fractures can be managed by non-surgical options like bone stimulator that delivers ultrasonic or pulsed electromagnetic waves that stimulate healing. But for other unhealed fractures, surgical treatment like bone graft or bone graft substitute.

Fracture Infection
Every fracture can get infectious and its prevention starts as soon as the patient reports injury. The main precautionary, as well as therapeutic measures, include:

  • Antibiotics
  • Debridement and irrigation to cleanse the wound and remove as much contamination as possible
  • Additional surgery to clean out the infection
  • Placement of special drains in the wound to rid of pus
  • Antibiotic delivery systems, like “antibiotic beads,” to provide higher concentrations of antibiotics
  • Amputation of the infected limb

Stress Fracture
While most of the stress fractures heal on their own with rest for 6-8 weeks from the activity and sports. But stress fracture can recur so the activity should not be resumed too quickly and harshly. In addition to rest, following may also help in the healing of fracture:

  • Shoe inserts or braces
  • Splint or cast to immobilise the affected area
  • Use of crutches or a walking stick
  • Surgery in cases of severe stress fractures